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Highest Protein and Lowest Calorie Hot Dogs in the UK

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Hot dogs, your classic all-American junk food, aren’t exactly the poster child for a daily diet staple – and I’m not here to convince you otherwise.

Yet, they’re irresistibly fun and undeniably tasty. So, if we indulge every now and then, which of the UK’s frankfurters are the best fit for our macro and calorie goals?

To answer this question, I checked the protein and calorie content of all the hot dogs available to buy in the UK.

Today will focus on the frankfurter sausage, hot dog rolls are up next.

Image credit: @fire.food.journey

Key takeaways

  • Hot dogs with the most protein per 100 calories are made from chicken.
  • Hot dogs with higher meat content have the highest protein content.
  • Hot dogs that have high protein per sausage can also be high in fat and calories.
  • Hot dogs with the lowest calories per sausage also have the lowest protein per 100g
  • There are no hot dogs in the UK that are specifically marketed as “high protein” or “low calorie”.

Why trust my picks?

My top-picks are 100% based on the nutritional data published by the retailer or manufacturers. They do not take into account subjective factors, such as taste, and don’t account for price. They are never influenced by any commissions or advertising deals. I will only make subjective comments about products I’ve had real experience with, and these opinions are not factored into the rankings. See the publishing principles page for more info.

Finding the hot dogs

To find the highest protein and lowest calorie hot dogs in the UK I searched the websites of all of the most popular supermarkets in the UK that make their entire range accessible online. I also searched Amazon to find any hot dogs by independent companies that aren’t stocked in supermarkets yet.

I used this data to create a table of every hot dogs that’s available in the UK with columns for highest protein per portion, highest protein per 100g, lowest calories per portion, lowest calories per 100g, and I calculated two metrics you won’t find on the packaging; highest protein per 100kcal and lowest calories per 10g protein.

Types of hot dogs I included

Here are the types of hot dogs that I’ve included:

  • Hot dogs (frankfurters) that come in tins, jars or microwavable packets.
  • Any kind of meat hot dog; pork, chicken, turkey.

I didn’t include: “mini” hot dogs or “cocktail” hot dogs (too small to go in a bun). “Gourmet” hot dogs that can’t be cooked in hot water or microwaved (they’re basically regular sausages), vegetarian/vegan/meat-free hot dogs.

Highest protein hot dogs (per 100kcal)

If you’re looking for hot dogs with the highest protein content per 100kcal, in other words “high-protein, low-calorie hot dogs” for those counting calories and trying to get the most protein for your daily calorie allowance, here are the top picks. 

#NameProtein (100kcal)Stockists
1Morliny Chicken Berlinki Hot Dogs8.42gASDA, Tesco,
Sainsbury’s, Morrisons
2Ye Olde Oak Peri Peri Hot Dogs (chicken)7.89gASDA, Morrisons
3Finnebrogue Naked Frankfurters7.65gOcado
4Herta Chicken Frankfurter Hot Dogs 7.51gTesco, Sainsbury’s,
Morrisons, ASDA
5Ye Olde Oak US Style Hot Dogs (Chicken)7.41gSainsbury’s
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)4.71gTesco (& most others)
Find more high protein per 100kcal hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

Morliny’s Berlinki 90% chicken hot dogs offer twice as much protein per hundred calories as a regular 75% pork hot dog, such as the Herta Classic.

That means for each Berlinky you eat (and come on, who’s only eating one?), you’re adding an additional large egg-white’s worth of protein (4g).

Image credit: @gottahotdogforyou

Highest protein hot dogs (per serving)

If you’re looking for hot dogs with the highest protein content per serving (one frankfurter), regardless of calories, here are the top picks. 

#NameProtein (Serv.)Stockists
1Wikinger Bockwurst Style Hot Dogs (mixed meat)11.70gTesco, Sainsbury’s, ASDA
2Iceland Luxury Ultimate Hot Dogs (pork)11.13gIceland
3Dino’s Famous Big Dogs (pork)10.80gTesco
4Bunlimited Classic Hot Dogs (pork)10.50gSainsbury’s, ASDA, Amazon
5Herta Jumbo Frankfuter Hot Dogs (pork)10.35gTesco, Sainsbury’s, Amazon
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)4.31gTesco (& most others)
Find more high protein per serving hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

Swap your Herta Original for a Wikinger, and you’ll be adding over 7g of protein per hot dog.

So if you had 2 hot dogs for dinner, you’d be adding 14g protein to your meal, that’s the equivalent protein of two Cathedral cheddar cheese slides.

Image credit: @shannan.slimming

Highest protein hot dogs (per 100g)

If you’re looking for hot dogs with the highest protein content per hundred grams, regardless of portion size, here are the top picks. 

#NameProtein (100g)Stockists
1Morliny Chicken Berlinki Hot Dogs16.00gASDA, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons
2Iceland Luxury 6 Ultimate Hot Dogs (pork)15.90gIceland
3Finnebrogue Naked Frankfurters15.60gOcado
4Herta Chicken Frankfurter Hot Dogs15.40gTesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, ASDA
5Bunlimited 4 Classic Hot Dogs (pork)15.00gSainsbury’s, ASDA, Amazon
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)12.30gTesco (& most others)
Find more high protein per 100g hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

FMorliny Chicken Berlinki Hot Dogs contain around 4g more protein per 100g than the ubiquitous Ye Olde Oak Classics. Per hot dog, given the size difference, that’s the equivalent protein to a tablespoon of peanut butter.

Image credit: @hi_pathetically_vegan

Lowest calorie hot dogs (per serving)

These hot dogs have the lowest calories per serving (one hot dog). It’s ideal if you’ve already met your protein goal and want the lowest-calorie option (be mindful of the sizes, though).

#Namekcal (serv.)Stockists
1Ye Olde Oak Classic Hot Dogs (chicken)39kcalAldi, Sainsbury’s
2Kingsfood 8 Hot Dogs (chicken)40kcalTesco, Sainsbury’s, ASDA, Morrisons
3Ye Olde Oak US Style Hot Dogs (chicken)53kcalSainsbury’s
4Tahira Halal Chicken Frankfurters54kcalTesco, Morrisons, ASDA, Sainsbury’s
4Tarczynski Chicken Fillet Frankfurters54kcalASDA, Tesco
5Wikinger Hot Dogs (mix; chicken, turkey, pork)63kcalIceland
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)91kcalTesco (& most others)
Find more low-calorie hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

You could switch from a Herta Classic frankfurter to a Ye Olde Oak classic and save 52kcal – that’s the equivalent of a kids size banana or what you’d burn going hard at a punching bag for 7 mins.

Image credit: @sw_what_gg_eats_

Lowest calorie hot dogs (per 100g)

To put the various sizes of hot dogs on a level playing field and give the larger hot dogs a chance, here are the lowest calorie hot dogs per 100g.

#Namekcal (100g)Stockists
1Ye Olde Oak Peri Peri Hot Dogs (chicken)152kcalASDA, Morrisons
2Tahira Halal Chicken Frankfurters160kcalTesco, Morrisons,
ASDA, Sainsbury’s
3Ye Olde Oak US Style Hot Dogs (chicken)162kcal Sainsbury’s
4Ye Olde Oak Classic Hot Dogs (chicken)169kcal Aldi
5Kingsfood 8 Hot Dogs (chicken)172kcal Tesco, Sainsbury’s, ASDA, Morrisons
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)261kcalTesco (& most others)
Find more low-calorie per 100g hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

Ye Olde Oak Peri Peri Hot Dogs contain 42% fewer calories than a standard pork frankfurter, such as the Herta Classic.

Image credit: @new_in_ni

Lowest calorie hot dogs (per 10g protein)

These are the hot dogs that allow you to add 10g of protein to your meal for the fewest calories (this doesn’t account for portion size).

#Namekcal (10g prot.)Stockists
1Morliny Chicken Berlinki Hot Dogs119kcalASDA, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons
2Ye Olde Oak 6 Peri Peri Hot Dogs (chicken)127kcalASDA, Morrisons
3Finnebrogue Naked Frankfurters131kcalOcado
4Herta Chicken Frankfurter Hot Dogs133kcalTesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, ASDA
5Ye Olde Oak US Style Hot Dogs (chicken)135kcalSainsbury’s
[Benchmark] Herta Original Frankfurter Classics (Pork)212kcalTesco (& most others)
Find more low-calorie per 10g hot dogs in the full data table.

In perspective

To get 10g of protein, you would have to eat around 93 calories more of Herta Classics than you would of Morliny Berlinkys.

That’s the equivalent calories of a curly wurly or 20 minutes of brisk walking!

Image credit: @funjustjustin

Make a suggestion

Found a product that I’ve missed? Please let me know by leaving a comment, sending a message via the contact page, or DM on Instagram.

Focus on the numbers 80-20 when you’re thinking about your diet. Eighty percent of the time, try to go for some of those more nutritious foods that will help to extend your life… …And then 20% of the time it’s OK to go for some of those, maybe less nutritious but fun foods, like a hot dog once in a while.

Christy Brissette, registered dietician – ABC Chicago

Just My Opinion

Before researching hot dogs, I had recently picked up some of the Dino’s Big Dogs. They seemed to be better than the other options at the time as they were 75% pork. The rest had a lower percentage and were mixed pork and mechanically separated chicken, which didn’t sound very appetising.

The Big Dogs did taste great, so I didn’t regret my choice at the time.

They are pretty huge, so they rank in the top 5 for protein per sausage due to the amount of meat in them. When we level out the playing field to protein per 100g or protein per 100kcal, though, they’re more like mid-table.

My diet is all about maximising protein for the least amount of calories. So the optimal choice would have been the Morliny Chicken Berlinki Hot Dogs which pack the most protein per 100 calories.

I think a hot dog should be made of pork, though; I don’t think the chicken ones quite hit the spot. I don’t mind additional calories when they have a high impact on taste and fulfilment.

The best-looking match for me looks like the “Iceland Luxury Ultimate Hot Dogs” (no modesty spared in the naming there). The Iceland Ultimates are made of pork, and they have just as much protein as Dino’s Big Dogs, but they’re 50kcal less per dog.

Pair them up with the optimal hot dog rolls, and I could have 2 large hot dogs in buns providing 30g total protein for under 600kcal. Those are not bad macros for junk food.

Considerations

The top picks above give you a shortcut to the items that best fit your protein and calorie goals. I do not recommend that you buy them without considering the other factors. Below are some examples of factors you may consider. And remember, if the top picks above aren’t a good fit for you, check out the full data table to see the other options I found that didn’t make the top 5.

Other Macros

The fat content of hot dogs can vary a lot. Higher fat doesn’t always mean worse quality, though, as it can come from high-quality animal meat. Surprisingly, for what’s primarily a protein product, hot dogs can contain a relatively high amount of carbs due to added sugar and other fillers.

Size

Hot dog sizes range from 22.5g to 90g. Larger sizes might offer more protein but may also increase calories and fat. And, of course, you want the size to be a good match for your hot dog rolls.

Meat Content

Notice the variety and description of meat used, such as “pork meat”, “chicken breast meat”, or “mechanically separated meat”, this is a good indicator of the quality of meat used. The total percentage of meat can also provide insight into how much filler is in the hot dog.

Processing & Additives

Be aware that hot dogs are processed foods, which often include additives such as preservatives (e.g., sodium nitrite) and flavour enhancers. These ingredients, necessary for shelf life and taste, vary by product. Understanding these additives can be a factor in your selection process.

Sodium

Hot dogs can be very high in salt.

Sources

Nutritional information for each top pick was taken from the retailer’s website.

All metrics on this page are calculated by us using data collected from retailer websites and compiled in my unique data table of all hot dogs available in the UK.

Protein and calorie amounts for other foods and exercises mentioned in the “In Perspective” and “Just My Opinion” sections were all obtained from Nutracheck. Please note that calorie equivalents for exercises vary depending on individual factors like sex and weight.

Images sources under each image, if not created by us.

What’s your favourite hot dog?

Let me know in the comments

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